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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 250 (some duplicates have been removed)
making to the bowel and this is all going to put more sales in the regional economy and again there is so much business activity. and we are blessed with just being in this part of the country and the world. i'm very interested in what we are going to hear from our speakers this morning to sort off guide us through this year. now before we get to our program please join me in thanking the organizations and people who made this possible. and you can clap now for awful them but -- this event is jointly presented by san francisco business times and our partner, title sponsor corn irand carey commercial new mark, night, frank. and we are going it hear from dan clef man and dan class man some 14 year ago really came up with this idea, we sat down over lunch and there was another person involved allen cline knelt and which came up with this idea and so i have to give dan much much credit for that. (applause). . very much so. and in 2012, cornish and carey, dominated the area of commercial real estate with over $6 billion in leasing and sales transactions so very good there. and you are soon
in the economy. still to come, the hunt for the hot idea. why venture capitalists are ramping up the search for the next big thing. that's later. but first, why farmers are bracing for higher expenses in 2013. that's next with bill moller. some quiet but very important changes are taking place down on the farm these days. they're prompted by the sky-high land prices that we have seen for the past few years, but also by new technologies and greater efficiencies. these changes are outlined in a report from the federal reserve bank of chicago. david oppedahl is the business economist who compiled the data. why don't you first talk, david, in general terms about these changes and trends? > > agriculture is seeing a lot of activity in the last few years as some of the commodity prices have gone up a lot and you see corn and soybean growing in terms of the ability to grow, but then also as the prices have been higher, the yields are higher in general, but then this last year was a drought year, so that kind of set some momentum back. but overall, the land values have been rising, the efficiencies
and seth them to in our economies is the keys key to success and we're making progress. san francisco unified continues to be the hive urban development are high. we've seen double digit high-grades among our latin and africa kids >> results are being recognized for our achievement we received a federal grab the to bring job training in our mission neighborhood. the supervisor knows about this. these gains are possible because reforms are underway the partnership are in place. for our kids to succeed in this economy we must do more. that's why this year i will propose in my budgeted more resources more than $50,000,000,000 and $25 million for preschool activities. i view education as an be investment not an expense. the folk in the road for many kids and many families the point at which they decide they're though stay in san francisco or leave. you're going to hear me talking about this layoff a lot this year. i want our middle squirrels to courthousess choose the road to success notes the road that leads to trouble or and is the one of the 3 san franciscans who went there know we mu
be quote as necessary to defense as it is to the national economy and the personal safety. as president, eisenhower set out to gather national support complete with a made-for-tv style campaign ad. >> in this century, america has become a nation on wheels. we ride on wheels to work, to shop, to play, to go about any place we want to go. we depend on wheels to bring us the food we eat and the clothes we wear and the things that we use, but when we depend on wheels, we depend also on highways. >> but of course, as all things in washington tend to go, the 34th president struggled with the lack of consensus. governors, democrat and republican, fought eisenhower e on with what they called his plan for the biggest federal aid programs, calling the republican president to task for running away from his staunch opposition to federal encroachment on state sovereignty. it was in fact the democratic senator from virginia, harry byrd, who tried to block eisenhower's plan, and byrd was known as a pay as you go man, and he had a wild hatred for debt. after a lot of coalition building president dwight
in the local economy by my parts. every person who works on my product is going to raise the price of my product. every hand that touches the unit that i sell, a certain percentage of the company buys this products. every time i go to a vendor to get a part, my costs will increase. my competitor build a similar part for almost a third of what i build a mine. you will take away the factory workers who manufacture my parts. this is all usa jobs. lower the price of gas. back to two bucks a gallon and you won't have to worry about the minimum wage. host: how would an economist pre-minimum wage respond to that caller? guest: you are raising the cost of that worker to that business. that worker will have more money to spend. you can make more profits. you can pass the cost to people who are buying your goods by raising prices. raising the minimum wage has an effect on the economy. the question -- if there is a chance it would raise unemployment or perhaps put a business in the red. host: michelle, tacoma, washington. caller: i just realized our state is one of the higher states with minimum w
in the valley, sacramento, or in d.c., that would strengthen the innovation economy? >> i could go on about immigration and corporate tax policy reform, but i am a researcher, so i will not. >> and we have seven minutes. >> mayor lee said it perfectly. the fundamental thing that companies are looking for is to be engaged in the process. we use a term in computing called agile. we look for more ability and the possibility to work with us, iterate in the process, rather than what we often see as we call the waterfall, take-it-or- leave-it. flexibility and agility is what is most important. >> mayor lee? >> i have always thought of our city as being the gateway to the rest of the world. i have often talked, with companies, i want to be with you when you turn the corner. we want to be the city that treats international markets for your products. i do not know if you know this but we have 70 counsel general offices in san francisco, the highest number outside of washington, d.c. we want to make sure that our companies know we are not just in it for san francisco, the region. we have to tap inter
are going to talk about silicon valley and the bay area innovation to the economy today. as you look at the panel, talking about the silicon valley, we have the mayor of san francisco. it will come into perspective, that when you have a giant like ibm anchor here in the valley, you are seeing in between companies like google and apple and facebook with incredible growth. in san francisco, mayor lee has welcomed to the fold in twitter, zynga, companies that are into cloud computing, hiring lots of people that not only want to live and work in the valley but recognize san francisco as being part of the valley. we are, indeed, fortunate, from san jose to san francisco, to be part of the innovation economy. we are finally seeing once again california's innovation is leading us out of the last three years of recession. i do not know about you but i am pretty tired of the recession. i made a statement several years ago that it was about time for an adjustment to the economy, things were too expensive, overheated. two years after that, i regretted making that comment. it was great to hear j
for the ratings agencies, tomorrow they come for the banks, and that's the last thing our economy needs. a gallup poll found that consumer confidence in banks is already at an all-time low. that includes the 1930's, when bankers lowered confidence by occasionally landing on consumers. [laughter] and i believe that an investigation will just make things worse. i don't think the banks are in any financial position to reveal what financial position they're in. [laughter] take wells fargo. their recent annual report said that the bank's value is partly based on, quote, "significant assumptions not observable in the market." [laughter] that means the value of the largest capitalized bank in the united states defies observation. [laughter] the human mind cannot perceive it. we dare not look upon it. [laughter] remember what happened to the accountants who opened lehman brothers' books. [laughter] point is, i believe when it comes to our economy, there are things we just shouldn't know. here to know them at me is financial writer and washington bureau chief of the "new york times," david leonhardt. dave
. the demand suicides has come up from the economy improving. and some tenants have been displaced who have taken up other places there's not layoff a lot on the port to lease. i should say those vacancy rates don't include the buildings we're in today or the vacant land. the other indicator we use is the annual revenues that has been hoover over 4 percent. the bigger story is we've got one account that repeals half of the out standing amount and once we're able to resolve that the delinquent rate will drop. now predictably we lost money in the industrial space storage facilities and parking lot this was due to the america's cup project as well as the displacement where the crews ship term is being built. we need the city to rehe bureaus us dues to some complications has not generated revenue for us however, we're expecting a revenue reimburse time. a lot of those costs have been offset by parking lot meter funds >> good afternoon commissioner this is marilyn i'm from the medical examiner division financial analysts. on the maritime does the revenue is up by 21.4 percent. and it's from two
to make the slightest bit of improvement in the economy. gerri: the number for the sequester will be half a percent. we are not even talking about curbing growth, but we are talking about a small backtrack. at the end of the day, we are not talking about a lot of money. but i would like to ask you that the president likes wants to spend $50 billion on infrastructure. didn't he do that just a few years ago? didn't we find that spending on roads and bridges was difficult because shovel ready wasn't so already? >> the stimulus was $800 billion. the president understood at that time that the american people would buy into anything because they were so desperate. the fact of the matter is when we look back on it, there wasn't enough shovel ready jobs. we didn't see what was promised, it has been about 80% almost the entire presidency. the american people are disappointed time and time again. expectations are low. the president taking stimulus, 50 billion. you could say, well, at least it's not 500 billion, that's many that we don't have. >> there is a story about congress having approval ratin
humira, to help relieve your pain and stop further joint damage. >>> the overall effect on the economy is slow down the recovery. not only end up being direct job loss but because the economy is softer it means we won't be driving down unemployment as quickly as we should. >> are you willing to see a bunch of first responders lose their jobs? teachers laid off? air traffic controllers and airport security, hardship on a lot of people. seep yours, middle class families scram to believe find child care for their kids. bad idea. a bad idea. >> the sequester was the administration's idea. in they were president obama's idea. >> the so-called "sequester" was obama's idea in the first place. he signed it in to law. >> white house lemede recommendd this. >> bret: conservative group crossroad gps launched that ad today, that video. before that you saw the president at the white house. answering president at appearance with the japanese prime minister. bring in our panel. fredbars, "weekly standard." juan williams, columnist with the hill. syndicated columnist charles krauthammer. fred, where d
roofers and home inspector and is then that has a booying fantastic on the overall economy having said that i'm not living with my head in the sand here i recognize that a lot of markets are still suffering a little bit and this graph show you's you the change of value in home price from their local market peak to where they are at present the case sowler composite and san francisco is halfway through the pack there down to about 33% and so whole values are still off from where they were before but if you look at where we are from the low point until where we are today, san francisco is looking a little bit better and oakland is not a member city and they randomly take 20 cities that are plead broadly representative of the housing market and san francisco is the second line on here and posted as one of the naysest paces of recovery and so we get some help from residential construction and we also get help from securelier spending this is what i'm showing here and this is the debt service ratio and it's an interesting concept if says if you add up my mortgage payment and car payment and
the importance of the other nine to five economy. the impact of all that you do has an impact on our job situation and local economy, and to highlight all of the great work that we can do together to ensure that the sectors that you all represent, the sectors that you work for, that you employ people for connaught is one of the greatest sectors in san francisco. i hope we will take the opportunity of the america's cup to showcase our clubs, our restaurants, our nightlife events. as someone who represents the broadaway neighborhood, an area of town that i used to spend a lot of time in when i was in my 20's -- but actually, very few locals take the time to head to the beach on broadway. our neighborhoods are coming together to say that broadway is open to the rest of the world as well as san francisco. i want to put san francisco back on the map when it comes to music. to make sure that we have the type of entertainment that we used to be renowned for. and those of you that work in our bars and clubs, i want to make sure that we are trading the kind of destinations that we look forward to
'll be on the ground in milan with the latest. we'll get a view about how the country's economy could be transformed as an exclusive interview. we're hours away from retail giant walmart's earnings. we'll hear what investors expect head of the company's reporting results in light of a weak start to february. >>> and shareholders vote on rothschild about replacing the board. we'll also get a preview of this likely ending of this battle of the titans. >>> and japanese prime minister shinzo abe is heading to walk to talk to president obama. just what kind of reaction can abe expect from washington? we'll give you a preview. >>> before all that, let's recap what's happening in markets. we've seen more activity, in fact, higher volume over the last couple of sessions, really, than we've seen for much of the year. the volume is coming on a sell-off. u.s. markets fell yesterday following the release of the fed minutes. it was the worst day of the year for the s&p and nasdaq. as you can see, shedding 108 points there, a rare triple digit decline this year. energy and material stocks were the worst hit. all
economy. we in this room and many of us working together took on the story changes for our city some of which have vexed for years >> years. i'm proud that together we through innovation and we foerjd our way ahead. to the city commissioners and to the department heads and to our friends in the business, labor you think non-profit and other communities who spent countless hours with us in negotiations and to the great people of san francisco who rewarded us with your support at ballet in san francisco thank you, very much. together we're putting san francisco back on the right track and building a solid foundation for all our residents. my fellow san francisco's we're living in a time of astonishing innovation and unlimited process we're driving that innovation and for or against the future right here right now not just for san francisco but for the whole world. within the lab of our technologies we're developing techniques will will save lives. to our market district we're providing the world with tools to live in the chewing print with 3-d or even topple dock - we're fashioned ou
of the improving economy and the increase in permit activity to help us get to the increased this year, i have discuss thed this with the mayor's budget office. they would prefer that we take this approach to looking at legislation to further increase our surcharge rates. they would look to avoid legislation right now for that purpose and instead rely on the increased in permit activity and the application of cpi to get us to our target. and they realized that if we don't meet our revenue needs, that it is the general fund that will need to bail us out and so it is really the risk that they are taking and they are understand that. i have been also talking about the control tore see if we could set up a rainy day fund or a reserve fund so that if we do close the year with a surplus we could hold on to that money and help us to close the gap that we might experience in the future and looking to see about that and open to that. so my recommendation would be to rely on those improvements in the revenue to get us through the next year and to look again a year from now to see if we need legislation
last year was. we're about probably 15 more units ahead in what we did last year. i can see the economy is coming back. >> they say that sales are typically brisk on presidents' day because of dealer discounts. a lot of car dealerships use the holiday to launch their spring lines. >>> on the heels of that warm spring-like weather we enjoyed over the weekend, winter has returned for the bay area. prepare yourself for cold and rain as you head out the door. up next. steve paulson is tracking the storm. >>> a very unique dog saves the day. how she was able to pull her owners to safety from a burning house. >>> we're looking at the seen of an injury clash was just cleared and did a little damage to the center divide there on northbound 280 in daly city. we'll tell you how the traffic is still unwinding and what you can do to get around it. mom, i invited justin over for lunch. good. no, not good. he's a vegetarian and he's going to be here in 20 minutes! [ mom ] don't stress. we can figure this out. ♪ [ male announcer ] get the speed to make a great first impression. call today to get u-v
put thousands of dollars per month in the local economy by my --buying my parts. every person who works on my product is going to raise the price of my product. every hand that touches the unit that i sell, a certain percentage of the company buys --country buys this product. every time i go to a vendor to get a part, my costs will increase. my competitor works in china. my competitor build a similar part for almost a third of what i am an american. you will take away the factory workers who manufacture my parts. this is all usa jobs. last point. instead of raising the minimum wage, lower the price of gas. back to two bucks a gallon and you won't have to worry about the minimum wage. i appreciate the opportunity. thank you so much. host: how would an economist pre-minimum wage respond to that caller? guest: you are raising the cost of that worker to that business. on the other hand, that worker will have more money to spend. as a business owner, you can make more profits. you can pass the cost to people who are buying your goods by raising prices. i think that is a little bit of
.s. economy is not adding jobs, the claims for uninsurance benefits up pas past-- combined with continued worries about economic growth lead the major stroke averages lower within the s&p 500 off by 9.5. >> susie: stocks weren't the only investments falling today. many commodities also ended lower, on top of steep declines yesterday. u.s. oil futures fell to there lowest point this year, closing at $92.84 a barrel. so what's at the root of the commodities sell-off, and will it continue? erika miller reports. >> reporter: selling was heavy in crude oil today, as it was in most commodities. but crude also fell on new inventory data showing a big jump in oil supplies. >> today we had an inventory number which came out, which we were expecting a build of around two million barrels. we got a build of around four million barrels. >> reporter: across the room, gold futures were little changed. although industrial metals like platinum and palladium got slammed. grain prices also plunged, with wheat hitting an eight-month low today. the thomson reuters-jefferies c.r.b. index, a global commodities
five weeks after that the economy completely crashed. my plan -- and i'm absolutely dogmatic about my plans --were delayed slightly. i would say that in this very difficult timefor the arts and everyone, especially the arts, it's phenomenal how new century has grown where many unfortunate organizations have stopped. during this period we got ourselves on national radio presence; we started touring, releasing cds, a dvd. we continue to tour. reputation grows and grows and grows and it has never stopped going forward. msk(music) >> the bay area knows the orchestra. you maybe take things for granted a little bit. that is simply not the case will go on the road. the audiences go crazy. they don't see vitality like this on stage. we are capable of conveying joy when we play. msk(music) >> any performance that we do, that a program, that will be something on the program that you haven't heard before. string orchestra repertoire is pretty small. i used to be boxed into small repertoire. i kept constantly looking for new repertoire and commissioning new arrangements. if you look at the first
is really happening right now in our economy. what better indicator than to look at wal-mart sales because they're now reportedly putting out their quarterly sales about a billion dollars short of what they expected. fox business network stuart varney joins me on that. as wal-mart goes, so is going the nation perhaps, stuart? >> oh, yes. this isn't just one single company, one single retailer. this is america's economy. very good indicator of that and the news is not good. as you suggested there, martha, their sales are flat to down in the same stores over a comparable period. they took in about a billion dollars less than they were expecting to take in. you got to bear in end into the gas prices have gone straight up. that leaves less money available to go spend at wal-mart. taxes for everybody went up on january the 1st. same story. less money for people to spend at wal-mart. this is a disappointing indicator for the overall economy. it confirms we're still pretty weak. martha: you get that divide. you see what is going on with the ground on retail sales like you're reporting right here
. our economy continues to grow at a steady pace. this past week the controller's office hosted a meeting of economists and other economic experts throughout the state to take a look at our projections for next year. and we will be assuming in the five-year financial plan that our economy particularly in these areas of property tax, sales tax, hotel tax will continue to be strong. aggregate discretionary revenues, a is up set of the revenues within the general fund and we have baseline requirements as identified in the charter. as you know, mta receives a significant amount of money from the general fund and with the additional good news, we will be depositing another $5.2 million to the mta in this year. additionally the library baseline will receive an additional 1.3 million, and the public education fund baseline will receive another 200,000. so, this is above and beyond the amount that was budgeted for each of these three areas. and then above and beyond that, mta receives a, an amount that's similar to the parking tax and, so, they will receive another 2.7 million. so, mta
economy just as opec cut some of its output. international sanctions are reducing the amount of uranium oil on the world market while here at home, refineries are shutting down for maintenance as they prepare to switch to a summer blend. then market speculation and a weaker dollar play a role. >> we have to work. so we keep coming to work every day. but you have to put gas in your car to come to work. >> reporter: 43 cents in a month. >> that was nbc's tom costello. >>> after the long holiday weekend you the president and congressional staffers will be back at work this morning but with only ten days to prevent $85 billion in automatic spending cuts. the white house says president obama will hold a news conference to address the issue this morning. nbc's danielle lee has the details. danielle, good morning. >> reporter: mara, good morning. the president will urge congress to agree on a deal that balances those pending cuts with new revenue to avoid hurting the economy and the middle class. mane while, congress is away on recess all week. when they get back, they'll have just four days t
economy, someone with a felony has great difficulty even accessing 5 a job that pays minimum wage. putting these felony convictions to a whole population of young people, we really perpetuate a chronic underclass which benefits none of us. and then of course there's the inequity in the criminal justice system. even though we can show that drug use rates are quite similar in all different ethnic communities and african-americans are 13 times greater likelihood of being convicted of a felony of simple possession. then of course there's also the savings that we could experience, nonpartisan, independent legislative analyst office has determined that there would be $159 million annually of savings at the county level, plus another $65 million annually in savings at the state level. and our bill would direct a portion of that savings to drug treatment programs so that we can, like these 13 other states, have better outcomes, safer communities. i of course have to thank the sponsors of our bill, and we have a number of them, the h.l.u. which has been a champion and the drug policy alliance as we
in the economy for the recovery to keep going. and i think that legislation will be helpful that way. as was mentioned earlier, planning, staff, any way has recommended doubling the entitlement period from three years to 6 years, but the planning commission has yet to actually act on that. when they put that to them in 2009, the planning commission turned that down. so, i don't know yet, whether or not they are going to also extend the planning entitlement period as we have done but this will help our customers definitely in terms of the building permit process. >> i think that the only other item that i wanted to mention to you is that as panel i just mentioned on the hacto, that is healthy air, clean, vehicles. we are in the process as we have been actually for some time now requesting a waiver, the legislation contains language that enables the department in order to fulfill its duties to be granted a waiver. and it has taken the department of environmental a little time to establish a process, they now have a process so that there is a submission, again, of our request for the wa
,000 jobs recording a growth rate more than three times that of u.s. economy as a whole. as any corporate leaders in this room can attest, this is a double edged sword. >> white house insists this is not linked to any specific government but says it will apply trade sanctions to discourage any trade secrets theft. >> families of high school students being warned after a eh a blood infection. a 27-year-old diagnosed and it affects the blood. the prints pal alerted them to that infection. officials say there is no outbreak. >> the disease is spread by close contact, me coughing right on you. it's not spread across the room. >> and the doctor posted information symptoms include high fear, vomiting and a stiff neck.[yq we're told the student is doing better. >> police looking for more witnesses and other possible victims in the case of a ta tae kwondo of instructor. he is free on bond. he's worked at the same redwood city academy for 12 years, investigators want to know if there are other possible victims out there. >> police trying to find a thief who stole a package from a door step of a ho
of the strongest cities in this country. however, there are other second degree terrors of the economy we haven't increased our monies here. so therefore we're in control is very important. and housing is needed and that's what i believe the mayor said. on the different subject matter and it doesn't pertain to this audience but pertains to
what dried up. dbi did fund that at one point in time and it may be as the economy picks up that we will look at perhaps, the funding, but also look at whether or not, in the appropriate situation whether that can be expanded to other than small property owners in certain situations. i would not say, necessarily, that 308 turk would necessarily be a candidate. but other prompts may be. that would definitely be something to be looked at. >> that would be great and maybe we could get together proposals around that. i think that it is a benefit. to have these buildings available. there are some of our lowest cost housing. but they really need to, we need to continue to focus on bringing the ha bitbility up. >> and the bliet cases that are very difficult cases for us to resolve so if that became available in the future it would be most helpful. >> as i remember it, the old programs, the surf program was funded by dbi and it was something that got... it was a commission action that dedicated that money to single family home owners. so it did not have to be that way. but we change that ha
firing on the suburbs. the economy here is devastated. and these shops are empty. there's no tourism. international sanctions are strangling businesses. and there is no end to this war in sight. josh? >> terry, thank you. and he'll be taking an inside look at the battle for damascus and what it means for u.s. national security tonight on "world news" and "nightline." >>> meanwhile, back here at home, new details about a potential motive in the newtown, connecticut, school shooting. gunman adam lanza may have, in fact, been competing with another serial killer. "the hartford courant" newspaper reports authorities found news articleses in lan za's bedroom, about the killing spree in norway, carried out by anders brevik, who bombed buildings at a youth camp, killing 77 people. the investigation is still ongoing. any theory now is purely speculative. >>> and new information on what left the carnival cruise ship stranded in the gulf of mexico last week. forcing 4200 passengers and crew to live on the boot for nearly a week without power and plumbing. the coast guard now blames a leak in a
for a rainy day withdrawal. in terms of remaining uncertainties, the economy of course is always -- there's some uncertainty, though, our revenues appear to be relatively healthy. benefit cost growth is a significant issue for us as well as our unfunded retiree health care liability which, as you'll recall, is $4.4 billion. our labor contracts, as i mentioned, will be open the second year of the budget. this budget -- the projection before you assumes no wage increase in the second year of the budget, but we will be negotiating with the majority of our labor unions not police and fire in the second year. we also, as you all have heard and i think this will continue to be an issue that comes up at this committee and in other places, the effects of federal health care reform are really uncertain. the way that the department receives revenue is changing dramatically. the people who will be covered, it's a whole new expanded pool of people. they have choices about where to -- where to consume health care. do he they want to be a dph client, do they want to go somewhere else. there is a lot of
are digging in their heels. you know what? the economy is going to go in the toilet. >> announcer: this is the "bill press show." >> jack, how old are you? >> nine. >> this is what 27 tons of marijuana looks like. (vo) with award winning documentaries that take you inside the headlines, way inside. (vo) from the underworld, to the world of privilege. >> everyone in michael jackson's life was out to use him. (vo) no one brings you more documentaries that are real, gripping, current. >> announcer: chatting with you live at current.com/billpress this is the "bill press show." live on your radio and current tv. >> bill: hey it is 33 minutes after the hour here on a thursday morning. and vice president joe biden says you want a gun? get a shotgun. not an ar-15. we've got it all covered here this morning on the "full court press." we're talking about the fact that republicans still seem determined they really think they can let the sequester happen, let the economy go as the congressional office warns into a total tailspin, reverse our economic recovery, cut 700,000 jobs here in this co
is that the impact of sequester would be negative on the economy. >> we just keep spending more money, would he create more dependency. we get more and more irresponsible, one crisis to the next, all of them manufactured, except for the real crisis, which nobody ever addresses and that is we can't afford any of this. >> the sequester, real crisis or politics as usual or both. karl rove joins us, nice to see you, karl. >> greta, great to see you. >> greta: okay, karl, is this a real crisis for the nation or is this just politics as usual or both? >> it's a crisis in this regard. we're talking about cutting 2.3% out of this year's budget. this year's budget is bigger than last year's. it's not like we're cutting below what we spent last year, but we're taking 2.3% of this year's budget and cutting it. now, that's 85 billion out of a 3.554 trillion dollar budget. that is a -- that's $35,540 billions of dollars and we're trying to cut 85 out. if we can't do that, we're in real trouble because we'd have a huge spending problem in this country and we've got to start somewhere. look, i don't want to u
with the the sequester. it's hanging over the economy. and you say like the airplane we are flying is going down and we're taking a break to watch the in-flight movie. so what are you talking about? is this sort of a lack of urgency from both sides? because there's no incentive for democrats nor republicans to cut a deal here? >> i am not saying that at all, alex. i'm saying that the house leadership on the republican side, which controls the schedule, controls the calendar, they have every power to bring us back to d.c., to go back to our desks on the floor of the house and work out the problem. with ten days to go before the ridiculous sequester takes place, we don't get called back to washington. instead, we have what we call a district work week scheduled. in other words, people are working on things other than averting this sequester. i think it's ridiculous. i think that even to see the republican house leadership working hardest on blaming president obama for the sequester is foolish. what we have is speaker boehner making posters about president obama trying to call it the obama-quester, sort o
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 250 (some duplicates have been removed)